How Do I Visualize My Money Goal?

This week's question from “Ask Us Anything” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

My goal is to hit a certain revenue number—42,000 dollars a month—consistently, and I’ve never done much visualization in the past. I think more in words, not pictures. So, I’m having difficulty seeing myself in the future, making this money. I really want to know the path of how to get there. Can you recommend a way to get past the feeling of needing to know all the steps of how, so I can actually see how I’ll hit that revenue number? I’m having trouble visualizing myself receiving that amount of money.

I’ve received it in the past, but I had a big client, so it seemed like a fluke. Even at the time, I didn’t think it would last. Now I’m back to receiving less than that.

First of all, money is a tool. It’s not a location or a destination.

Money doesn’t mean anything unless we have a very specific, real, tangible reason for it.

So, the first step is to figure out:

What do you need that money for? Have you actually done the homework to determine how much you’re going to need for that thing?

If you’re having trouble seeing yourself receiving this month…you might not be a visual thinker.

If you think in words (rather than pictures), then don’t worry about visualizing.

For you, it’s more about the repetition of an affirmation. That’s all you need.

You don’t actually need to be able to “see” the visual of what you’re doing.

Because you think in words, your brain works a bit differently, and that’s perfectly fine.

The idea is… you know your number. You know the amount of revenue you want to reach.

You ONLY need know what you have to do right now. The rest won’t be revealed to you until after you do what’s in right front of you, right now.

If you sit and wait for the whole thing to manifest—or if you wait to know all the steps first—you’ll never get there.

Just take action on the first step in front of you.

The rest will reveal itself.

For affirmations, write down this sentence, and say it to yourself over and over again, every day:

“I’m so happy and grateful now that I consistently earn $42,000 a month easily and effortlessly.”

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 2 ways we can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Each week, we drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in our Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!

Save

How the Wealthy Use Debt (Vs. the Middle Class)

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Whenever I want to do something, I have a tendency to look at the budget, see what money I have, and ask, “Can I afford this right now?” If I can’t, then I’ll turn to debt—a credit card, bank loan, etc.

Over the last couple of months, I’ve started to see our cashflow go down. I found myself getting more excited about using debt than going out and creating the wealth to get what I want. But it feels like that’s “letting myself off the hook.”

Do you have any advice on how to reverse this? It’s like the law of polarity—instead of going into debt to do the things I want, how do I create the wealth and income to pay for those things?

Neagle Code Answer

First of all, let’s understand that the correct use of debt can move us forward to the goal.

The question shouldn’t be, “Can I afford this now?” The question should be, “Do I need this right now?” That’s not based on the money in your account—it’s based on, “Do I need this in my business right now?” That’s what I would look at first. It’s either a yes or a no question.

If yes, ask yourself—“If I need it, what’s the best way for me to pay for this? If I use debt, I free up incoming cash. So it gives me more options.”

Ask yourself:

  • Do I need to have cash freed up?
  • What is my financial situation looking like?
  • Is this a tight time where I really don’t want to use all the cash that’s coming in?

Not using the incoming cash might be the best strategy. It’s a strategy to be used to win.

The other thing is… the more money you make, the more you should be making your money work for you.

Your money should out-work whatever the cost of your business is.

If you need something in business, look at how you’re going to pay for it, then manage it from there.

If you talk to really successful people, almost all of them will tell you, “Don’t use your money. Your money should be working for you. Use somebody else’s money.”

Because if you’re smart, you can make more on your money than what it’s costing you to use someone else’s.

As far as “getting excited about using debt”—I think it’s fine that you’re getting excited about it. It allows you to expand your resources. Because it’s a tool—it was created to do that.

The problem is, most people think about debt, not in terms of using it to build their business or increase their income—they think about debt as a necessity. They think, “I don’t have any money. So I have to go into debt to pay for something.”

That’s how the middle class uses debt. That’s not how wealthy people use debt.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

Should I Hire This Person Even While I Have Cash Flow Problems

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Over the past two years, I’ve been having cash flow challenges. We’ve been generating income, but we’ve still had very high expenses. We’ve also had challenges in retaining some of our staff. We’ve found a great hire now, but she’s $1,200 more expensive than anyone I would’ve hired in that position before. She’s leaving the top firm in my country to come to us.

In the back of my mind, with all of our cash flow challenges and debts, I’m feeling overwhelmed and a little guilty. I fear that if she comes on board…what if I can’t afford to pay her? How can I set my mind right about this situation?

Neagle Code Answer

I would look at two things:

  1. Will she bring in new business?
  2. Will she free up your time (or whoever else’s time needs to be freed up) to bring in new business?

If the answer is yes to either of these questions, then this person will be worth the cost of hiring her.

If she’s not going to bring in new business… then consider whether she can free up YOUR time, so that you can bring in new business.

How much work will this person take off your plate? Is that enough time for you to go out and create enough business in order to make it a smart hire? If so, then that’s the decision to make.

People need to realize that if you want good help right now, the help is out there.

There’s a ton of help out there. But you’re going to pay a premium for it.

The only thing you have to make sure is that it makes sense to the bottom line.

Is it going to solve your problem? Is this person as good as they project themselves to be?

I would have no problem making a decision like that, and then making sure I brought in enough business for them to take care of.

The worst-case scenario is… you’d have to let them go because you can’t pay them. And then you’d have to make the money to pay them for whatever work they DID do. But that’s not a bad consequence.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

They Said, “I Can’t Afford It” Without Knowing My Price

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

I’ve been focusing on sales, sales, sales this past week. During my sales calls, I keep getting objections around money.

One person knew she wanted to work with me (she said it was a “no brainer”). But before I could tell her the price, she said, “I can’t afford it right now. I just got back from traveling to another country and I’ve spent all my last money on getting home.”

I pointed out that I hadn’t even shared the price yet. She laughed and said she just needs a few months to get her stuff together. How do I handle this kind of objection?

Neagle Code Answer

When she said she couldn’t afford it—the moment you realized she didn’t even know how much the price was—your response should have been:

“Do you have any intention of saving the money? Or do you just not want to do this? Because you said ‘no’ without even knowing what the price was.”

You need to get down to what the real problem is,
and cut the BS.

Otherwise, you’re not dealing with the real problem.

This is a person who’s afraid to tell you, “No.” One of the most difficult things for a human being is to tell another person, “No.” You have to give the person permission to say no, if you think that they’re BS’ing you.

Anybody who says “no” or “I can’t afford it” without knowing the price, probably isn’t someone you want to work with anyway.

When someone says, “I can't afford it”—what they’re really telling you is, “It’s not a priority in my life right now.” That just means you haven’t conveyed the correct urgency in that call.

If it’s urgent enough, a person will move it to the top of the priority list in their life.

If it CAN be urgent enough,
your job is to help them see that it’s urgent.

To tap into a person’s urgency during a sales call, it’s very simple.

Ask them, “What do you want?” And get to the core of what they really want. Ask them, “What’s going to happen if you don’t change?” Ask, “How serious are you about changing this right now?” That’s it.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

When Do I Tell Prospects the Price?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

Can you help me understand where in the sales conversation I should be addressing pricing? Should I interject it right at the beginning of the call, or wait until they say yes to my service?

Neagle Code Answer

When they say yes to your service.

Think about this: What’s the purpose of the price?

You have to be very careful when it comes to price in the mind of the client. You don’t want the sale to be based on price. You want it to be based on the client’s need, desire, and urgency. That’s where you want the person to make the decision from.

You should know who your ideal client is so well, that you’re targeting people where price won’t be a psychological issue for them.

There are basically two kinds of people in the world:

  1. People trained from a young age to buy within certain price ranges
  2. People who aren’t

Now, I sell things that cost a lot of money, so I’m looking for people who feel that it’s normal to pay a certain amount of money for a service. If I go after people where their idea of “personal help” is to pay about $148, there’d be no way that I could charge for what I do.

So I take that into consideration.

Are these people trained to buy at certain price levels? Is it normal for them to buy at the price range I suggest?

If so, then it’s not an issue of whether or not they think the cost is too much.

The issue is, where can they come up with the money? That’s a natural progression into them paying.

If somebody comes right out and says, “Hey, how much does this cost?” I’ll tell them.

I won’t avoid the question.

But then I’ll talk about what’s important for them, because they’re not buying based on price. They should be buying based on necessity, urgency, and desire of what you have that they want.

I would totally have an open conversation around price with someone. If they say, “Okay listen, I just want to know the price,” I’d say, “Why do you want to know the price? Does it matter what the price is if you have this issue and it needs to be fixed?”

If it does matter, then the issue isn’t the most important thing in their life. How much money they have or don’t have is the most important thing in their life, and they’ll always be limited by that evaluation in their mind.

The sales conversation needs to be about their problem and their desire to change it.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

Why Do I Hesitate When Talking About Money?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

I’ve noticed when I’m having sales conversations—when I get to the part where we talk about money—I hesitate. This happens if I perceive that the other person has limitation of what they think they can pay. That’s where I personally have struggled (around money).

When we get to that part of the conversation, I feel a strong urge to offer them less, charge less, or work with them anyway. My unease seems to have two parts—one part is them (and the story they’re telling me). The other part is me (and me buying into their story and believing it). This also happens when I’m working with a client, and midway through, they tell me they can’t afford to continue. How can I work through this piece within myself?

Neagle Code Answer

When you’re interacting with someone on a sales call or even during a coaching call, you have to completely stay out of their story, even if it’s very similar to yours.

You can’t go in their story at all.

You have to refuse to do so.

You need to stay out of it, even if the money issue isn’t a hundred percent cleared up in your own life.

The way you do this is through the idea of obedience. Whatever you’re being “obedient” to becomes the truth in that moment.

Are you being obedient to their story?

Are you being obedient to the truth of abundance?—and that everyone on the planet has the same amount of money, even if they’re not aware of it?

If the person is saying, “I can’t afford this; I don’t have the money,” that’s a secondary issue. It’s not the real problem. The problem is they’re not acknowledging their desire and their deserve-ability so that they have the urgency to actually do it.

Money just becomes the excuse.

If we focus on the excuse, we don’t solve the problem.

What that conveniently does is—it walks both of you into that story and neither one of you makes any progress.

If the client has a desire and urgency to work with you—but not the money—you can work with them on coming up with the payment.

We have people who come to us with the idea of non-payment frequently and Steph or Sarah will work with that individual on, “Okay, so what will you commit to do? How can you bring this money in? What’s going on? What’s causing you to not be able to make the payment?” We’ll try to coach them through whatever problem they’re having, so they can pay it.

If they actually do that work, we’ll continue to work with them.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Virtual Summit! In April 2022, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

Time & Money Are Never the Issue—It’s Always Priorities

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

During my sales calls, people are like, “Yes, yes, yes!” Then when we start talking about the money, they say, “I don’t have the money”—or “I want to do this, but now’s not the right time.” How do I get around this?

Neagle Code Answer

If people are saying, “Yes, yes, yes,” and they’re not buying, then it sounds like your sales calls are out of balance somehow. When you start talking about money, if they’re telling you it’s too much—then you’re not doing the call properly.

Price is never the issue. Urgency is the issue.

Time is also never the issue—it’s always priorities.

If someone says they don’t have enough money—really, they don’t have enough urgency. You haven’t brought urgency to the forefront of the conversation, to the point where they want to do it right now.

Remember, one of the four questions in a sales call is: “What do you want?” You have to sit with the person until you’re certain they’re telling you exactly what they want.

There will always be an emotional connection to that answer.

There’s no coldness to it. There’s no flatness in their tone. You’ll hear an emotional expression in how they talk about it. They’ll have a sense of grief or loss around the idea of not getting it.

If you’re doing that and the money objection still comes up, don’t run away from it. If they say, “I don’t have the money” or “That’s a lot of money”—say, “Wait a second. Just relax for a minute. Let’s not worry about how much this costs right now. First of all, do you see the value in doing this?”

Start reminding them of why they said that they wanted this:

  • Why do you want this?
  • What will happen if you don’t do it?
  • Is all of what you just told me true?

When they say, “Yes,” ask, “Is it also true that if you could find the money, this would be something you’d want to do?” (That should also be a yes.)

Then say, “It’s not that you don’t have the money—it’s just that money is a challenge for you right now. What if we put our heads together and try to figure out a way for you to get the money to be able to do this? Let me advocate for you. Let me help you win.”

If that’s scary for you, then be willing to face that fear. That’s what you have to tell them.

Don’t be afraid to lose the sale.

There are so many ways for people to get money, it’s crazy. Money is so easy to get. But when your mind gets locked down around the fear of not having it…you’ll lose the sale or lose the client.

Always go back to: “How can I help this person?” with every call. It’s just two people having a conversation.

Allow yourself to be resourceful in your own psychology, so that you actually can help someone.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Virtual Summit! This October 2021, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

How Do I make the Money I REALLY Want?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

My question is around raising our “need line.” I’ve heard you say we always get what we need, and we have to raise our need line first before we can significantly increase our income. What I need to make is $35K a month. But my goal (what I want) is to make $100K a month.

Back when you picked your goal of making $50K a month, what were you planning to spend the money on? Did you do anything to raise your need line, so that you HAD to make $50K a month? Did you back-engineer to get to that number?

Neagle Code Answer

Great question. I don’t think there was anything specific that I needed to spend that money on.

At that point in time, I had already moved beyond the idea of spending money on a specific thing. My focus was on bootstrapping my business, so I needed more money in general to advance the company.

I was doing a tremendous amount of traveling, and it was all first class. I needed to expand my team and hire the people who I needed to hire.

I also needed a larger amount of money consistently, so that I wasn’t chasing as many sales on a regular basis. I was spending all my time on the phone, making sales, and it still wasn’t enough at the end of the month. It didn’t matter how many hours I spent making calls—I still didn’t have enough money at the end of the month. So I needed to balance that more in my life and my business.

I was like, “This is insane. I’ve got to change this.” The change came from needing to leverage how much I was actually making per sale, so that I had more to work with.

I didn’t back-engineer to get to my goal of $50K a month. I just picked that number because it was a simple idea of turning my annual income into a monthly income. I really wanted to make that quantum leap. Bob Proctor is the one who put that idea into my head.

One of the cool things about turning your annual income into a monthly income is, it’s already working within an established belief system.

You already believe you can make that amount of money—you’re changing the timeframe in which you earn that money.

You already have the belief that you can make your income annually. Why is that important? Because most of us don’t have negative connotations when it comes to time, not like we do with money. So we’re not changing the belief around the money; we already believe we can earn it.

We’re changing the belief around the timeframe in which we earn it, which is a big difference. And that allows people to make that quantum leap much easier.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Virtual Summit! This October 2021, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

Is It Good to Save Money?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous. 

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

I’ve heard you say money is currency, and it’s not meant to be held onto forever. So I was curious, how do you pair that mindset with saving money, diversifying, and investing? Those things are important too, right?

Neagle Code Answer

I don’t “save” money. With everything I do, I invest money. My money’s moving all the time. For the most part, my money is in a place where it’s doing some kind of good. It’s being put to work for me.

I invest in things that will grow myself, and/or my business—things that will pay off either immediately or at some point in the future.

I don’t hang on to money from the aspect of being afraid that I won’t have any.

That thought doesn’t ever cross my mind. I know that I can always make more money if I need it.

As far as diversifying and investing your money into different things, I think that’s an intelligent thing to do, for sure.

Sound financial principles are about growing your money, preserving the principle, and putting it to work for you.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Virtual Summit! This October 2021, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save

Why Can’t I Hang On To Money?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous. 

Neagle Code Question

Hi David,

I’ve recently raised my prices and made almost $24,000. People are coming to me and asking to work with me, which is great. However, I’m having an interesting scenario where money’s coming in unexpectedly—and then in the same day, more of it goes out.

Bills are getting paid, and I’m happy to pay them. However, it feels like I’m chasing a dangling carrot. Stuff is coming in one day, only to be gone again the next day. It’s bizarre. I’m feeling anger and resentment about it, and find it hard to be in gratitude. Can you give me some guidance?

Neagle Code Answer

Do this quick little exercise. Hold your breath…and keep holding it. Don’t let it go. Just keep holding it.

Keep holding it…

Keep holding it…

Keep holding it…

If you’re like “David, I can’t do that,” then realize; you can’t do that with money either.

Just like you need to exhale and breathe in again, money needs to be spent (i.e., circulated) and brought back in again. That’s part of its nature.

Money wasn’t meant to come into our bank account and just stay in there. It’s meant to come in, and then go back out. Whether it’s for paying bills, being invested, donated, paying for things…

It’s meant to be in circulation.

The whole reason you bring it in, is so that you can send it back out again. It’s doing what it’s supposed to do. If bills are getting paid, and you’re making the money to pay them, that sounds like a good scenario to me. I’m not seeing a negative here.

My question to you would be: Are you paying yourself first?

This is the biggest mistake I see entrepreneurs make. They pay everyone else first and then resent the fact that there’s nothing left over for them.

This requires discipline.

If you want to generate wealth, I recommend setting aside 10% of your income and only using it toward things that appreciate. Do this religiously and without exception.

Once this becomes a habit you will see how easy it is to make enough to pay yourself AND everyone else.

You’ve got to take responsibility for your own situation.

You have to manage your money, and if you’re not good at it, hire someone to do it for you.

Join me on Tuesday for a free two-part training where I will be sharing More Hidden Secrets Inside A Wealth Mindset. CLICK HERE for all the info!

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Virtual Summit! This October 2021, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

Save