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How Do I Get Control of My Calendar?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

I’ve let my calendar get the best of me. My to-do tasks get filled in around whatever open space I have. I get drawn into answering emails that seem important in the moment, but they’re not. How can I anchor my day?

How do you and David manage your calendars? Do you have a to-do list? Do you segment your day, based on what you’re doing that day?

First of all, you’re not a victim to your calendar. You create your calendar. You’re in control of it.

You can create your days however you want to create them.

David and I manage our calendars differently, in a way that suits our personalities. We time-block some things, and don’t time-block other things.

For David, Mondays are usually podcast recordings and research days. Tuesdays and Wednesdays are TEM90 and coaching calls. Thursdays and Fridays, we schedule our VIP days, our custom VIP days, or any travel.

For me, it’s a bit more complicated, because I have more small things that I do on a daily basis.

What I’m hearing in your question is that you’ve got a real problem keeping boundaries around your calendar, and with what you say you’re going to do.

With email, you have to decide when you’re going to answer email. That’s all that matters. I don’t care if something seems urgent—it’s not.

There’s nothing that can’t wait 90 minutes, 2 hours, or even 3 hours. You don’t need to respond.

It’s a trick of your subconscious mind designed to completely distract you and keep you from doing the things you say you’re going to do.

That just takes discipline. Tell yourself, “I’m going to answer my email at this time of day and this time of day—and that’s enough.”

It always is enough. There’s nothing that can’t wait.

If you have a team and something urgent pops up, or something’s bleeding or on fire, then give your team access to you through text, so they can message you in case of emergencies, rather than email you. That will take care of the need to constantly check email.

You can also set up clear boundaries with your clients. If you email me or David on Friday, you won’t get an answer until after the weekend, because there’s so much going on on Friday.

Part of that is communicating boundaries with your clients about when they can expect a response from you.

Everything that goes into your calendar should be purposeful, and reverse-engineered from where you want to go.

The “big rocks” go on my calendar first—travel, big family events, holidays, vacations.

Next, any midsized things (like trainings) go on the calendar.

Finally, I break each of those down into what needs to happen to get to those end results. I put those tasks on my calendar.

Everything I do is reverse-engineered from where I want us to be, by when.

I do have a to do list. (It helps keep my brain straight.) I usually only have three things on it that I absolutely must get done that day.

 

 

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways we can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Each week, we drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in our Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join us at The Art of Success Summit! This October, We are getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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Resistance Around Hiring Someone

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

I’m a nutritionist and I see clients for several hours each day. There are certain things I need to do to grow my business, but if I’m still the practitioner, I have limited time. Plus, there’s self-care—eating lunch, working out, etc. If I’m working, sitting in the office all day, it feels less healthy. I know I need leverage.

Still, I’m having resistance around hiring someone. Twenty years ago, I managed employees, and had good and tough experiences. Maybe I’m scared to hire someone. What if I bring a ton of drama into my life by hiring someone, and it goes south? Do we all go through that fear of hiring people?

Neagle Code Answer

I don’t think that’s the right question. It doesn’t really matter if everyone goes through that.

What matters is that you make the most use of your time possible.

I’d recommend 3 things:

1) For 1 week, keep a notebook next to you, and write down every single thing you do each day. This will show you where your time is being spent.

Track all the $10/hour tasks that you do, like managing your calendar, sending clients reminders, setting things up on your computer. That’s all stuff you shouldn’t be doing, because it’s not the best use of your time. Those tasks don’t require your skill level or your brilliance.

You could easily pay someone to do $10/hr tasks for you.

If you take those off your plate, how much MORE you could
do—both on your business and in servicing your clients?

2) Look at how many times a day do you say the same thing, or teach the same thing to people?

If you’re repeating yourself over and over again, start to record those things, so you can send clients the recordings. Begin to build a bank of trainings, so that you can inform them, rather than repeating yourself.

3) When you’re looking to hire someone, put them through a process that will give you key indicators of what they’ll do for you.

It’s actually easy to spot people who are high-drama early on in the hiring process.

If I ask, “Hey, are you willing to do a test project?” Instead of a simple yes or no response, they’ll send me, “Yes, I’d love to. But I have this going on Saturday, and I have this on Sunday. So I won’t be able to get it to you until Monday afternoon, but maybe then it might be Tuesday…”

You can get an idea that this person won’t be a good fit.

Get as much information as you can from someone before you even bring them in for an interview.

You HAVE to hire if you’re going to scale. It’s required.

Look at your role mathematically. It’s like a formula. There’s only so much time in the day. You want to spend most of your time doing high-dollar tasks. Offload the low-dollar tasks to someone else, because mathematically you’ll make more money.

The first hire should be an assistant, even if it's only for a couple hours a day.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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How the Wealthy Use Debt (Vs. the Middle Class)

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

Whenever I want to do something, I have a tendency to look at the budget, see what money I have, and ask, “Can I afford this right now?” If I can’t, then I’ll turn to debt—a credit card, bank loan, etc.

Over the last couple of months, I’ve started to see our cashflow go down. I found myself getting more excited about using debt than going out and creating the wealth to get what I want. But it feels like that’s “letting myself off the hook.”

Do you have any advice on how to reverse this? It’s like the law of polarity—instead of going into debt to do the things I want, how do I create the wealth and income to pay for those things?

Neagle Code Answer

First of all, let’s understand that the correct use of debt can move us forward to the goal.

The question shouldn’t be, “Can I afford this now?” The question should be, “Do I need this right now?” That’s not based on the money in your account—it’s based on, “Do I need this in my business right now?” That’s what I would look at first. It’s either a yes or a no question.

If yes, ask yourself—“If I need it, what’s the best way for me to pay for this? If I use debt, I free up incoming cash. So it gives me more options.”

Ask yourself:

  • Do I need to have cash freed up?
  • What is my financial situation looking like?
  • Is this a tight time where I really don’t want to use all the cash that’s coming in?

Not using the incoming cash might be the best strategy. It’s a strategy to be used to win.

The other thing is… the more money you make, the more you should be making your money work for you.

Your money should out-work whatever the cost of your business is.

If you need something in business, look at how you’re going to pay for it, then manage it from there.

If you talk to really successful people, almost all of them will tell you, “Don’t use your money. Your money should be working for you. Use somebody else’s money.”

Because if you’re smart, you can make more on your money than what it’s costing you to use someone else’s.

As far as “getting excited about using debt”—I think it’s fine that you’re getting excited about it. It allows you to expand your resources. Because it’s a tool—it was created to do that.

The problem is, most people think about debt, not in terms of using it to build their business or increase their income—they think about debt as a necessity. They think, “I don’t have any money. So I have to go into debt to pay for something.”

That’s how the middle class uses debt. That’s not how wealthy people use debt.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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Can I Help Someone Who’s Older Than Me?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

I need help reframing this thought in my mind. When I get on a sales call with someone who’s older than me, there’s a thought that says, “I don’t have as much life experience as them.” I start to worry that I can’t help them.

How can I turn this around? How can I change this thought to something that’s more constructive in my mind?

Neagle Code Answer

Here’s a truth that applies to everybody.

Everyone on the planet has the ability to teach you something you don’t know, and you have the ability to teach them something they don’t know.

It has nothing to do with age.

Everyone has different life experiences, different upbringing, different perspectives, and different skill sets.

When you’re on a call with someone, you’re bringing something that you know, love, and are good at, into their life. They wouldn’t be talking to you if they didn’t need it. They don’t have it right now—that’s why they’re looking for help.

Everybody can teach. Everyone has the ability to teach something to another person.

I’m very good at just a few things in life. Every one of you could be experts in things that I don’t know anything about.

The same goes for everyone else.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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What If I Can’t Keep Paying My Team Members?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

I’m hitting a new level and I just feel drained. My fear radar is going off.

After meeting with you and Steph, I felt so energized. I hit the ground running. I was like, “Yes!” I got a bunch of stuff done and hired two new employees who just started.

But something got in my head. Now I feel like my energy is drained, and I’m questioning everything. I think it’s fear of having these two new people on the team. I’m responsible to make sure I can pay them. I’m having all these amazing new experiences and new chapters in my life, and I think it’s coming from fear. How do I keep up the momentum?

Neagle Code Answer

If you can’t pay them, you let them go.

Stop worrying about it.

Do you get this stressed out over paying your electric bill? Do you only think about, “How am I going to pay my electric bill? What if I can’t pay my electric bill?”

No, nobody does that.

You know what your problem is—you’re worried about what they’ll think of you.

Who cares what they think about you? It’s only important for you to know what YOU think about you.

Yes, it’s true—you’re responsible for paying someone. You’re making an agreement. You’re saying, “If you do this work, I’ll pay you.” But that’s happening on a week-to-week basis.

Business changes. Sometimes people go out of business. Sometimes people go broke. Jobs change. People sometimes get laid off, quit, or get fired. That’s just the way it is.

All you have do is say, “I will do everything in my power—I will do my very best—to make sure I’m living up to these responsibilities. And if I blow it, I’ll start over.”

That feeling of being drained is normal.

When you worry about something that much, it’s an energetic suck. It takes all the energy out of you.

The reason you were so pumped after working with Steph and me was because we focused on the possibility of what you could do. You were buying into our belief. You were excited about the direction you’re headed in.

…But then you started thinking about what could go wrong. And that’s draining as hell.

Also, when you’re going to a new level, doing new things, and you’re able to pay for new things—that’s an adjustment to have to make mentally.

Most people have to adjust to the fact that they can actually buy the things they were told all their life they could never have. When you have money, you can buy more of those things, and you can have more of them on a regular basis.

Sometimes there are mixed emotions that go along with that.

Just say, “I’m so grateful that I get to live my dream. Everything is going my way. Everything will always go my way. I just need to keep my mind focused on the direction I’m going.”

The fear will always be there. You just need to have gratitude for it, and have gratitude for all these changes.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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I Get Nervous Before Sales Calls

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

How do I prepare myself mentally and emotionally before a sales call? I notice that immediately before I get into a call, I get nervous. There’s a fear, doubt, or worry that comes into play. I have no idea what the person will say.

Also, I don’t want to be attached to the outcome. I give them service, I listen to what they say, and I don’t have any expectation of them saying “yes.” In fact, I assume they’ll say no, or that they’ll think about it. And that’s the result I get, because I'm afraid of getting attached.

I know we’re not supposed to be attached to the outcome, and we’re supposed to “command the result.” How do you NOT attach to the sale? How should I go into a sales call to prepare?

Neagle Code Answer

It’s a simple little switch. You think to yourself, “I don’t need this—I want this.”

Needing something will get you attached. Need comes from fear and scarcity.

Tell yourself, “I don’t need the sale. I want the sale.”

Note: A want or a wish is different from desire. It’s okay to want things. It’s okay to desire something, as long as you’re not coming from fear. Everything depends on why you want something.

In order to mentally and emotionally prepare for sales calls, you can do things to put yourself in a good energetic state.

Do something to get out of your head, be in the moment, and to release all those feelings of doubt or fear.

Listen to music. Dance, or do something physical.

If you want to review any information the client submitted beforehand, or go through the questions you’ll ask them, you can do that too. You want to keep everything simple and not make it too complicated.

Getting ready from an “information” standpoint is one thing, but getting emotionally ready is something else.

I used to use music all the time. When I did sales calls, I would crank it up. Before a call, I would take three deep breaths, and get centered.

Remind yourself that you’re a professional, and you’re about to help someone change their life. Just center yourself, and use the music to get into a good space.

Do this over and over again with every call.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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How Do I Handle This Money Objection?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

In a recent sales call, I quoted my price for coaching. The woman (who is a therapist) said, “That’s a little more than what I thought it would be.”

I asked her what she was comparing it to. She said she wasn’t sure, because she hasn’t ever looked into hiring a coach before. How do I handle her objection?

Neagle Code Answer

The question I would ask her is, “What did you think the price would be?”

If she says she has no idea—and she’s also saying the price is higher than what she thought it would be—those two statements are completely incongruent.

When someone is concerned about the price, it’s because they’re comparing it to something.

When someone says anything related to the price—e.g., “I’ve never spent that much money before,” or “That’s too expensive,” or, ”I don’t know if I could afford that,” you’re witnessing—in real time—someone making a psychological comparison to something else in their mind.

And they don’t even realize they’re doing it.

This is how the brain works. If the subconscious mind doesn’t have experience purchasing something for that amount, it compares it to, “Well, what else have I done in the past? What else is familiar to me within this pattern?”

It engages a pre-set pattern. But generally, the pattern has nothing to do with the output. It's just trying to keep the person safe.

If she tells you what she thought the price would be—that’s where she’s doing the comparing.

Most people who haven’t worked with a coach before are comparing the coaching to counseling or therapy.

Here’s what to do…

The idea is to get her focused on the result, the value of that result, and how important it is to her.

It’s never about the money. It’s about how much the person values the result.

I’d say to her, “Listen, if you absolutely knew you’d get the result…would the result be worth what I’m asking you to pay?”

If she says yes, you say… “Then it’s not about the money. It’s about… are you willing to commit to doing the work, to get the result?”

How do you guarantee that a person will get the result? Do you have to make a guarantee? It depends on what you do.

When a person hires me for coaching, I guarantee they’ll get the result if they do the work. I tell them, “If you do the work—if you do exactly what I tell you to do—I guarantee you’ll get the result.”

That’s the only way I can guarantee it. Otherwise, I have no guarantee.

If I’m selling you a toaster, I guarantee it’ll work if you plug it in. If you don’t plug it in, I can’t guarantee anything.

It’s about being responsible TO the client, not FOR them.

You can guarantee how you’ll be responsible to them. But whatever work they have to do on their end, you can’t guarantee that… because they’re the ones who have to do it.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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Is There a Problem with My Leads, My Sales Calls, or My Mindset?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

I’m going through a major sales slump. Normally I sell 25% of the time—or 50% if it’s a high-quality lead. I’ve had 20 leads and not one sale. These people seem price-conscious, saying, “I’ve never spent that much money before.” So, the leads may not be as high quality. Higher-net-worth individuals seem more likely to sign up with me than middle class or those with a job.

How do I determine if this is a problem with my leads, my mindset, or something  else? I’m starting to feel anxious.

Neagle Code Answer

First of all, never let an outside circumstance affect you emotionally. Otherwise, it starts controlling you.

Secondly, you shouldn’t ever have slow periods. You have to think resourcefully every time you have a problem.

Based on your knowledge and expertise, ask yourself, “Is there an issue with these 20 leads?” Be honest with yourself about the answer.

The longer you’re in business, the more you understand the quality of different things you have to put in place to generate leads.

If there’s a problem with the leads—figure out why you have that problem, and fix it so it doesn’t happen again. Do you need to hire a new digital marketing company or copywriter?

Make sure you understand what qualifies someone to be a high-quality lead or not.

If there’s no difference in the leads and you’re not making any sales—then something got in your head.

Regarding “price-conscious” leads…nobody’s price conscious.

It’s all about urgency and what they value.

Nobody cares about price. If that’s what they’re communicating to you, it’s because they don’t know how to communicate anything else.

If you keep hearing price objections, understand that that’s your belief. That’s the meaning you’re giving to it.

Higher net-worth individuals understand what they value in life, and they’re willing to pay for more value.

People who are price conscious don’t value the right things in life. They value the fear of making a mistake, insecurity, lack of faith, or what other people think about them.

On a sales call, you have to get the person to see the actual value of working with you or purchasing from you. You have to be really clear on what that value is, and how it will affect their life.

Figure out, what do they want? What’s their desire or need that’s close to their heart? Not the surface answer, but the real need. Stay with that question until you find out what they emotionally want.

Then ask, “What happens if you don’t buy this?” No matter what it is, there’s a consequence if they don’t buy. The size of that consequence will determine the urgency of the purchase.

If the urgency is there, the value is there.

When someone says they don’t have enough money, time, or they have to check with their spouse—it’s because you didn’t find the right urgency in your questioning.

Dig to find the urgency. Don’t move from one question to another in the sales conversation until you’re damn certain they’re giving you an honest answer.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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How Do You Help Someone Figure Out Their Passion?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

I’m an entrepreneur, and my partner is not. I want to build, grow, and see things. He has working class mindset, always working for someone else. But he’s intrigued by everything I’m doing, and he’s open to it.

I feel like we’re going in different directions. When I ask him what he wants, he always says, “I don’t know.” He’s trying to figure that out. I say, “You have to go try things. Why don’t you go for that dream job? Why don’t you talk to people?”

Is that the right approach? How can I help him find his passion? How can we see if we’re on the same page or create a direction? He wants to fit into my life of freedom, but I want him to have his own passions and dreams.

Neagle Code Answer

I would sit down, have a conversation and say, “Let’s take a week and decide what we want for ourselves in life.”

Take a week, write down everything you want in your life…and have him do the same.

Then, after the week, come back together and compare notes. See where you are.

Talk about, “What do we want together?” Create a vision for what you guys want together. Break it down to, “Okay, how are we going to create this in our life, so that you get what you want individually, I get what I want individually, and we both get what we want together? And then we make it work.”

That will determine the next steps.

It’s important that you both have the freedom to really say, truthfully, what you want. If you’re hiding something—or you think your partner would be offended or might not want the same thing—or if you’re like, “That won’t work”… you might have a codependency thing going on, where he’s letting you be the leader.

But that never works out very well.

No matter what the outcome is, you have to give each other permission that you’ll be 100% honest about what you want.

Here’s another thing. When someone keeps saying, “I don’t know,” they’re actually giving their brain a command to NOT give them the answer.

Our brain is extraordinarily resourceful,
if we learn how to use it.

Instead of saying, “I don’t know,” he could start saying, ”I know it’s coming. I know the answer is coming. I give myself permission to know what it is.”

Here’s the truth, which I deeply believe:

Humans are not the one species on the planet that was born with no direction. We all have a purpose and a direction. We were just taught to ignore it during childhood (for whatever reason), so that we could survive.

Your partner just needs to start talking. His self talk needs to change a bit. Give him the space to come up with what he wants.

Don’t pressure him in any way. Let him write down whatever he knows that he wants, because you can only start where you are. He just needs permission.

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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Am I Setting a Goal or Making a Decision?

This week's question from my portal “The Neagle Code: Directions for Life” comes from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.

Neagle Code Question

What’s the difference between setting a goal and making a decision? I’m struggling with differentiating the two in my mind.

For example, let’s say I want to get up at 6:00 am and take a cold shower. That’s a decision, right?

But then I have a goal that I want to make $X amount of dollars. That’s a goal, right? Can you clarify the distinction of where it breaks from being a decision to just setting a goal?

Neagle Code Answer

They’re both part of each other.

When you set a goal, you need to figure out, “What do I need to do to reach that goal?”

The decision is about, “I’m going to accomplish this goal, and I’m making a decision to do it, based on cause and effect of what needs to be done to reach that goal.”

First you set the goal.
Then you make a decision to reach that goal.

From there, figure out what actions you need to commit to, in order to reach the goal.

Here’s an example. If I sat down with my CEO, Steph, and said, “Hey, let’s set a goal to make an extra million this year…” we’d sit down and reverse-engineer what that would look like.

  • How do we want to make that money?
  • What do we want to do?
  • What are you and I going to commit to?
  • Do we need to hire someone?
  • What needs to be done?
  • For how long?
  • On what days?

We’d break it down into activities—all the way down to the smallest details.

Set the goal, make a decision to reach the goal, brainstorm how to get there, then commit to taking those actions.

Commitments are just decisions along the way.

If you don’t chunk your goal down into specific activities, then you haven’t really set the goal. You haven’t made a decision.

You have to turn the goal into activities that are based on cause and effect. What is the cause of this goal that you want?

P.S. Whenever you're ready… here are 3 ways I can help you grow YOUR business:

  • Listen to The Successful Mind Podcast. Three times per week I drop cutting edge information and strategies relating to success mindset, leadership, wealth creation, and relationships.
  • Join other like-minded small business owners in my Transformation Facebook Group! Allow us to be a place to share ideas, get advice, and meet others who value truth and growth!
  • Join me at The Art of Success Summit! This October, I'm getting a group of amazing business owners together for 3 days to work on exponentially growing their business.

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[523.251,1046.50]
[523.251,1046.50]